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Living Well with Diabetes

Track Your Readings Every time you check your blood glucose, use a log to keep track of your readings (see below). You may check in the morning, at bedtime, and before and after meals. Be sure to write down all your numbers. Use your log to record things that might have affected your blood glucose. This may include being sick, being very active, stressed, or eating special foods on a holiday. What Do the Readings Mean for You? Keeping track of your blood glucose readings helps you identify patterns. These patterns tell you how your actions affect your blood glucose. For example, you may notice high or low numbers after eating certain foods. Use these patterns to make decisions about steps you can take to keep your blood glucose in your target range. Be sure to take your log book with you every time you see your health care provider. And be honest! There are no “good” or “bad” numbers. The readings just tell you if you need to make changes to your treatment plan. 19 Sample Log 7am 144 9am 185 12pm 124 2pm 230 5:30pm 152 7:30pm 180 10:30pm 129 ---- ---- Chapter 2: Monitoring Your Blood Glucose My Blood Glucose Log Print out this log to record your daily blood glucose readings. Bring your recent logs to all doctor’s appointments. BLOOD GLUCOSE LOG Before 2 Hours After Before 2 Hours After Before 2 Hours After At Bedtime Middle of Night Day Breakfast Lunch Dinner Nighttime (if needed) Time Number Time Number Time Number Time Number Time Number Time Number Time Number Time Number What I was doing Sun Mon Tues Wed Thurs Fri Sat Comments: Make extra copies of this chart before you use it the first time. This information is not intended as a substitute for professional healthcare. Always follow your healthcare provider’s instructions. ©2015 StayWell, LLC. www.staywell.com 800-333-3032 All rights reserved. Made in the USA. Print out this helpful sheet to track your daily blood glucose readings.


Living Well with Diabetes
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