Page 20

Living Well with Diabetes

Chapter 2: Monitoring Your Blood Glucose How the A1C Test Helps You use a meter to track your blood glucose every day. But you also need to know if your treatment plan is working for you over time. An A1C (glycated hemoglobin) test can help. This test measures your average blood glucose level over 2 or 3 months. If your A1C number stays too high, your treatment plan may need changes. Your A1C Goal An A1C result often is shown as a percentage. Your health care provider will help you figure out your target A1C. Many people aim for an A1C of 7% or lower. The general goal of <7% appears reasonable for many adults with diabetes. Higher or lower A1C goals may be appropriate. Ask your health care provider what A1C goal is right for you. Your target A1C number will depend on your age, general health, and other factors. Achieving your A1C goals may help lower your risk of complications. The A1C Test The A1C is a blood test. It measures how much glucose is connected to a protein (called hemoglobin) inside the red blood cells over the prior 2 to 3 months. You will likely have an A1C test every 3 to 6 months. Your health care provider may have your A1C tested 2 times a year (ie, every 6 months) if you are meeting your treatment goals and have stable blood glucose control. However, your health care provider may have your A1C tested more frequently (eg, every 3 months) if your therapy has changed or if you are not meeting your blood glucose target. Talk with your health care provider to schedule an A1C. And don’t forget to follow up on the results. Without Diabetes Red blood cell With Diabetes 20 Glucose Healthy red blood cells have some glucose connected to them. Glucose A high A1C means that too much glucose is connected to the cells.


Living Well with Diabetes
To see the actual publication please follow the link above