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Living Well with Diabetes

Be Smart When You Exercise Being active may cause blood glucose to drop faster than usual. This is especially true if you take certain medications to help control your blood glucose. But there are things you can do to help reduce the risk of low blood glucose levels. Keep These Tips in Mind • Include friends and family in your activities. 37 Being active with a “buddy” is safer than being alone. • Wear a medical ID bracelet that says you have diabetes. • Always carry identification. Carry a cell phone in case of emergency. • Use the right safety equipment (such as a bicycle helmet). • Be sure to wear closed-toed shoes that fit your feet. • Drink plenty of water before and during activity. • Keep a fast-acting carbohydrate (or glucose tablets) on hand in case of low blood glucose. • Dress for the weather. • Avoid being active for long periods in very hot or very cold weather. For instance, go out in the evening if it’s too hot during the day. • Skip activity if you’re sick. Notice How Activity Affects Blood Glucose Physical activity is important when you have diabetes. But you need to keep an eye on your blood glucose level. Check often if you have been active for longer than usual, or if the activity was unplanned. Make it a habit to check your blood glucose before being active. Check again several hours later (blood glucose may decrease for a few hours after activity). Use your log book to write down how activity affected your numbers. If you take insulin, you may be able to adjust your dose before a planned activity. This can help prevent low blood glucose. Talk to your health care provider to learn more.


Living Well with Diabetes
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